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NEUROSCIENCE BACKED TECHNOLOGY

Neural
Coupling

Learning
Pathway

Neurochemicals
released

Strengthened
learning links

Sources:

“What listening to stories does to our brains” – Buffer.com

“Learning how to Learn” – Dr. Barbara Oakley

“Trust Factor” - Neuroeconomist Dr. Paul Zak

NEUROSCIENCE

We collaborated with experts across psychology, learning, neuroscience and organizational behavior to design Stories, an experience that augments team interaction and group learning.

LEARNING PATHWAY

By sharing a lived experience, a storytelling player plants his/her ideas, and emotions into the listening players’ brain. This actively begins to create a declarative learning pathway from the prefrontal cortex through the hippocampus.

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STORIES COMMAND ATTENTION

The human brain has a strong tendency to lose focus. It is estimated to engage in up to 2,000 daydreams a day and to spend up to half its waking time wandering. In the presence of an interesting story, though, this mental meandering goes to zero.

STORIES LIGHT UP MORE OF THE BRAIN

When the brain is presented with factual information, only two of its regions activate. FMRI studies show that storytelling causes many additional areas to light up. The brain responds to the story events as if they were actually happening to the listener.

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STORIES SYNCHRONIZE AUDIENCES

When the brain sees or hears a story, its neurons fire in the same patterns as the speaker’s brain. This is known as neural coupling. “Mirror neurons” create coherence between a speaker’s brain and the brains of his/her audience members.

STORIES CONNECT EMOTIONALLY

Through a process psychologists call “narrative transport,” good stories engage listeners emotionally. Engaged emotions create empathy with the speaker.

CHEMICALS & HORMONES

The brain releases Dopamine (feel-good hormone) into the system when the player gets excited seeing the listeners’ reactions. Oxytocin (bonding and trust hormone) is fired while discussing his/her reactions making Stories a highly effective social-learning platform with high recall rates.

STORIES AID MEMORY

Game design elements augment stories to help release dopamine which aids as memory markers helping remember what you are told with greater accuracy.

STORIES CAN CHANGE BRAIN CHEMISTRY

When captivated by an emotionally engaging story, the brain produces oxytocin, a substance shown to increase generosity, compassion, trustworthiness, and sensitivity to social cues.

SOCIAL LEARNING STRENGTHENS LEARNING LINKS

Learning Links are activated through this turn-based storytelling & listening experience that are further strengthened with post-experience reflection, retrieval and recall methods for both storyteller and listeners.

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